Coles Hallam becomes Australia’s first Green Star Rated Supermarket

Citygreen - Coles Hallam becomes Australia’s first Green Star Rated Supermarket

Coles Hallam becomes Australia’s first Green Star Rated Supermarket:

Coles has achieved the first Green Star rating for a supermarket, awarded by The Green Building Council of Australia (GBCA). Coles in Hallam (situated in outer-south-east Melbourne) achieved the 4 Star Green Star rating. Designed by Michael Carr Architect, key achievements at the Hallam store include:

  • 50% more fresh air compared to minimum standards through high-performance heating, ventilation, and air conditioning 
  • 15% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions with highly-efficient chillers and heat reclaimed from refrigeration cases used to supply heating in other parts of the supermarket 
  • LED lighting to reduce energy consumption and internal heating loads 
  • 70% reduction in water consumption compared to traditional supermarkets with water-efficient fixtures and fittings, and 150,000-litre capacity water tanks 

Coles Hallam is also the first supermarket to undergo a, “Life Cycle Assessment, allowing Coles to make comparisons between different materials and products to select healthy, efficient and sustainable options.”

The GBCA’s Chief Executive Officer, Romilly Madew, said, “Coles, in their determination to develop a supermarket of the future, has set a new benchmark for sustainable supermarket design in Australia. Coles now has a framework for sustainable supermarkets that are not only more efficient and cost effective to run, but are also more comfortable places in which to work and shop.”

Madew added that the GBCA has compelling international researching confirming that, “…green retail buildings featuring good natural light and ventilation, high-performance heating and cooling systems, and materials low in harmful chemicals, are not only more efficient and cheaper to operate, but can also improve the experience for customers and return on investment for owners.”

Curtin University Awarded $500,000 to Research Green Innovation in the Built Environment

Citygreen - Curtin University Green Innovation Built Environment

Curtin University Awarded $500,000 to Research Green Innovation in the Built Environment:

Western Australia’s Curtin University has been awarded $500,000 by the Cooperative Research Centre for Low Carbon Living for research into green innovation in the built environment. The grant will fund five PhD research scholarships focused on the university’s Master Plan – which was awarded Australia’s first 5 Star Green Star – Communities rating earlier this year.

Curtin’s Vice Chancellor, Deborah Terry, said, “The Greater Curtin Master Plan aims to rebuild the Curtin campus as a city of innovation. Central to this is the notion of it being a model of low carbon development as well as enabling research and development into every feature of the building process.”

The project will be led by Curtin’s Sustainability Policy Institute’s Professor, Peter Newman, in partnership with Curtin’s planners, the private sector, local and state government, the local community, and staff and students. Mr Newman said, “The vision of the node is to extend Curtin’s work in low carbon living through a focus on regenerative cities and regions. The application of these tools will help other precinct-scale developments to use the latest innovations in low carbon, high-performance buildings, infrastructure, and land development processes.”

The Cooperative Research Centre for Low Carbon Living (CRCLC), which has awarded the grant, is a, ‘national research and innovation hub that seeks to enable a globally competitive low carbon build environment sector.” The Centre brings together, “property, planning, engineering and policy organisations with leading Australian researchers”, to develop, “…new social, technological and policy tools for facilitating the development of low carbon products and services to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the built environment.”

For more information on Curtin University’s Master Plan, watch this video.

image curteousy of Curtin University.

Raising The Roof on Urban Landscape Design: Greenroof Future

Citygreen - Raising The Roof on Urban Landscape Design: Greenroof Future

Raising The Roof on Urban Landscape Design: Greenroof Future

As humans, we focus on what we see every day. It stands to reason that much of the discussion of urban canopy and landscape projects and developments take place at ground and subterranean level.

With each passing year for approximately the past 15 years, however, more and more design visionaries and their taskforces are raising their eyes upward…to our rooftops. With the massive amount of square miles taken up by buildings, re-purposing their roofs help us reclaim some of the lost land and create a whole other kind of landscape.

Diana Balmori of Balmori Associates, NY couldn’t agree more. “We need to create a different balance between the inert surfaces and the living surfaces,” Balmori said. With the exception of pockets of urban parks, cities have the sky, the earth, and stories of glass, metal, cement and rock between them. Watching how city dwellers flock to those park spaces, Balmori realizes that there’s a wealth of untapped, unutilized potential not only for the human city dwellers, but the flora and fauna grasping for a foothold in a gray world.

A robust example of the success a rooftop landscape is Balmori’s own 667 acre Public Administration complex in Sejong, Korea. Balmori Associates says, “We proposed a new approach to city-making, one that starts with landscape architecture. The master plan consists of a continuous linear park on a continuous roof joining all the ministries.” In conjunction to providing a reprieve for persons, the task of building a green roof with wildlife in mind requires a whole other set of considerations. “Creating biodiversity on a green roof or green wall is significantly different than restoring it on ground level. On a rooftop there is no preexisting ecology to enhance; everything is from scratch,” states the Green Roof Service webpage of Jörg Breuning, owner.

Given this, the plants, animals and insects are essentially living under an altered set of circumstances, which could affect their continuing habitation and ability to thrive under the new conditions, even with a perfect replication of a landscape indigenous to any particular area.

From an infrastructural standpoint, the installation of green roofs presents vast benefits, including prolonging the life spans of rooftop materials, decreased use and energy consumption of HVAC units, stormwater management, and significant moderation of the Urban Heat Island effect.

Green Roofs for Healthy Cities Community webpage states, “Through the daily dew and evaporation cycle, plants on vertical and horizontal surfaces are able to cool cities during hot summer months and reduce the UHI effect. The light absorbed by vegetation would otherwise be converted into heat energy.” With such evidence of benefits being discovered and explored from several standpoints: the human element, ecology, and infrastructure, a future with more green roof designs should be just on the horizon for landscape design experts, scientists, engineers, and others.

photo credit: Green Roof GardnerCC

Singapore’s Building and Construction Authority (BCA) announces S$20 million scheme to support green building innovation

Citygreen - Singapore Building Construction Authority BCA Green Building Innovation

Singapore’s Building and Construction Authority (BCA) announces S$20 million scheme to support green building innovation:

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