How Understanding Soils and Watering Can Prevent Street Tree Failure

A new video released by Citygreen demonstrates the importance of understanding soils and watering to prevent street tree failure. Citygreen Consultant, Nathaniel Hardy, visits a stressed street tree located in the dry climate of the ACT. Despite being irrigated with a suitably large volume of water, the tree is lacking outer foliage with bare, dead branches clearly visible. So, why is the tree failing to thrive despite receiving the required volume of water?

Nathaniel draws attention to the finely-textured, clay-filled soil in the rectangular garden bed surrounding the tree. A circular mulch ring around the tree is simply not big enough to cope with the volume of water being provided, so much of the water is escaping into the larger garden bed and then onto the surrounding pavement. Because the pavement is only slightly elevated, water does not have a sufficient opportunity to penetrate the fine soil and irrigate the roots below. Instead, we see a dry, caked soil surface which has become largely impervious to water.

As the video demonstrates, simply providing the required volume of water is not enough. Understanding the character of your soil and the runoff behaviour of water provided is integral to providing an environment in which street trees can thrive.

To find out more about Citygreen’s innovative water sensitive urban landscape solutions, visit www.citygreen.com. To speak to Citygreen about this video, email info@citygreen.com.

Shepparton Urban Forest Strategy aims to reduce tree vandalism

tree vandalism

Greater Shepparton City Council is planning to plant 1500 trees each year as part of its urban forest strategy. Frustratingly, each year 60 to 80 trees in Shepparton are vandalised – about 5% of all new tree plantings. These senseless acts of destruction are costing the council between $15000 and $20000 a year.

Heath Chasemore, council’s Park, Sport and Recreation Manager, said street trees cost $250 to replace – including maintenance to establish the trees. In CBD locations, costs are even more with more advanced tree stock required, services and other infrastructure to work around.

Disappointingly, a second wilga tree was recently damaged along Vaughan St, Shepparton – the second incident of damage to trees in this shopping precinct.

Chasemore said, “We do lose a small percentage of trees to vandalism each year — roughly five per cent. This behaviour by a limited number of individuals shows little or no regard for our community and is extremely disappointing.

“Wilga trees are hard to propagate and slow growing, however we have had great success with this species in our Vaughan St precinct, where they have prospered and provide great aesthetic appeal to the streetscape as part of our urban forest strategy. The cost of replacing trees and dealing with senseless vandalism ultimately is borne by the ratepayers.’’

It is hoped the urban forest strategy will increase awareness of the benefits of urban trees and reduce the rate of vandalism.

Source: http://www.sheppnews.com.au/2018/01/10/126850/leave-street-trees-alone

World’s first vertical forest for low-income housing coming to the Netherlands

Stefano Boeri Architetti Eindhoven Trudo Tower facade
© Stefano Boeri Architetti

Stefano Boeri is famous for his vertical forests around the globe, but his latest project will be the first forest tower funded by a social housing project to provide low-income housing. The Trudo Vertical Forest, located in Eindhoven, will showcase how good architecture can tackle both climate change and urban housing issues.

The tower will consist of 19 stories with 125 units – all covered in a luscious vertical forest featuring 125 trees and 5200 plants. The 246-foot tower will be covered in a rich, biodiverse environment to help control urban pollution and provide homes for a variety of animals and insects.

Boeri said, “The high-rise building of Eindhoven confirms that it is possible to combine the great challenges of climate change with those of housing shortages. Urban forestry is not only necessary to improve the environment of the world’s cities but also an opportunity to improve the living conditions of less fortunate city dwellers.”

Francesca Cesa Bianchi, Project Director of Stefano Boeri Architetti, said, “The Trudo Vertical Forest sets new living standards. Each apartment will have a surface area of under 50 square meters and the exclusive benefit of 1 tree, 20 shrubs and over 4 square meters of terrace. Thanks to the use of prefabrication, the rationalization of technical solutions for the facade, and the consequent optimization of resources, this will be the first Vertical Forest prototype destined for social housing.”

Source: https://inhabitat.com/the-worlds-first-vertical-forest-for-low-income-housing-is-coming-to-the-netherlands/

Forget the beach – go somewhere green for ultimate relaxation

Cornmeal Parade

In the land Down Under, we’re currently in the thick of a long, hot summer. Most of us spend our spare time during this season at the beach. But, what if there was another destination that offered even greater relaxation? Somewhere less busy, searing, and sandy? Somewhere green, of course. In Australia, we’re lucky to have more than 500 national parks – wild, rejuvenating, and free for all.

Lord knows we need a little relaxation. According to an Australian Bureau of Statistics survey completed in 2007, one in five Australians experiences a mental disorder each year. Most common are anxiety disorders, like obsessive-compulsive disorder, social anxiety, or panic disorder.

Thankfully, there is a relatively simple salve with more than 40 years of research showing that exposure to nature increases calm, decreases agitation, and improves concentration and creative thought. Writer and I Quit Sugar dynamo, Sarah Wilson, is renowned for her solo hikes – jumping on a train to a national park somewhere out of town and disappearing into the wild for days at a time. She says she returns settled, sated, and full of creative ideas.

Of course, when we’re not on holidays, it’s not always possible to plant ourselves in a national park. In this sense, urban greenery is more important than ever before.

Zoe Myers, an Urban Design Specialist at the University of Western Australia, says research shows that city dwellers have a 20% higher chance of suffering anxiety and an almost 40% higher chance of developing depression. Fortunately, research also shows that people in urban areas who live closest to the greatest green space are much less likely to suffer poor mental health.

The benefits of urban greening are endless – cooler cities in summer, warmer cities in winter, slower stormwater runoff, filtering of air pollution, habitat for animals, happier people, and more prosperous local economies. If you can, take a trip to a national park and soak in the natural goodness. But, when you’re back at work, don’t forget to take lunch in the park – toes in the grass, breeze in your hair, eyes on the branches above.

Source: http://www.smh.com.au/comment/keep-calm-reasons-to-head-for-the-park-not-the-beach-20171223-h09pzg.html

Nathaniel Hardy, Advisory Consultant, USA West Coast

nathaniel hardy profile picture

With expertise in soils, horticulture, and organic waste recycling, Citygreen consultant, Nathaniel Hardy, offers a rare and comprehensive blend of experience. As a Soil Scientist and Horticultural Scientist, Nathaniel completed a Bachelor of Science (Majoring in Horticulture and Soil Science) with first class honours, followed by a Masters of Business Administration through the Macquarie Graduate School of Management.

Out in the field, he has succeeded in a variety of advisory roles across numerous industries, including: wholesale ornamental horticulture, the cut flower industry, retail horticulture, soil science consulting, soil manufacturing, and organics recycling.

Today, in his role as Advisory Consultant at Citygreen, Nathaniel leverages his broad expertise and experience to deliver a holistic, educational approach to urban placemaking. Collaborating with a range of stakeholders from Landscape Architects through to Civil Engineers, he promotes a combination of key ingredients for successful urban forests, including: healthy tree stock, nutritious soil, choosing the right trees for the location, and lastly implementing an engineered system that provides trees with adequate space and soil while also managing, utilising, and cleaning urban stormwater. With a broad understanding of both environment and business, Nathaniel balances constraints in both areas to deliver environmentally and commercially viable solutions.

Nathaniel believes in the value of urban greenspace and its benefits, including shading, urban food production, water treatment, and community wellbeing, and is passionate about leveraging innovative engineered systems to achieve these benefits in the built environment.

A typical work day includes:

  • Collaborating with Landscape Architects on their urban green space designs to ensure the maximum ROI for the designer’s clients.
  • Providing information to Pavement and Structural Engineers about tree root behavior in order to manage the interaction between pavement and tree root growth.
  • Working with Urban Foresters to develop sustainable tree planting guidelines, tree management plans, and helping to build the urban forest.
  • Travelling to deliver keynote speaker sessions on urban trees, urban soils, and LID WSUD.

To talk to Nathaniel for advice or book him as a speaker, call +1 541 625 3820, email nathaniel.hardy@citygreen.com, connect with him on LinkedIn.

Time to take action on green roof policy in Sydney

Sydney urban area

One thing is certain as we look to the year ahead – it’s going to be HOT. In the first week of 2018, Sydney scorched with 40 degree temperatures and nearby Penrith was the hottest place on earth, hitting a searing 47.3 degrees.

As Sydney’s building boom rages on, never before has the need for green infrastructure with an emphasis on sustainable cooling been so important. With more apartment buildings and concrete streetscapes likely to increase the urban heat island effect, these same apartment buildings hold the key to a much-needed cooling innovation.

Architecture and sustainability experts say there is an unprecedented opportunity to harness the ever-expanding rooftop coverage by making green roofs and walls a standard feature on new residential and commercial buildings. Scientific research has repeatedly recognised the insulation benefits of living infrastructure in reducing energy consumption in summer and winter.

However, the lack of proactive policies mean this opportunity is quickly slipping through the fingers of government, councils, and residents alike. In the City of Sydney, the only NSW council that has a specific policy on green roofs and walls, there are just 53 green roofs, which equates to less than 1% of the total available roof space. A waste indeed.

At a policy-level, Sydney lags well behind other, denser cities such as Singapore, London, Stockholm, and Toronto when it comes to promoting the installation of green roofs and walls. Sara Wilkinson, from the UTS school of Built Environment, said about 32% of horizontal surfaces in Sydney are rooftops, but the potential has remained largely untapped. “Greening them really does make a change to heat stress and your urban environment. We are missing an opportunity to create a beautiful garden city.”

Let’s hope we can emulate places like Singapore where the uptake of green roofs has boomed by more than 800% in the past decade, with 80.5 hectares of skyrise greenery across 182 projects. Our environment, wellbeing, and wallets depend on it.

Source: http://www.smh.com.au/nsw/missed-opportunity-for-green-roofs-as-sydneys-apartment-boom-continues-20180118-h0k8pu.html

New study: plant 20% more urban trees and double the benefits

urban forest

A study in Ecological Modelling, conducted by Parthenope University of Naples in Italy, has found that planting just 20% more trees in our megacities would double the benefits of urban forests, including pollution reduction, carbon sequestration, and energy reduction. Authors of the study say city planners, residents, and other stakeholders should increasing the nature in our urban areas by planting more trees.

Nearly 10% of the world’s population live in megacities – that is, cities of at least 10 million people. For these people, urban forests are paramount to physical and mental wellbeing and economic prosperity. Examples of urban forests in megacities include Central Park in New York, St James’ Park in London, and Bosque de Chapultepec in Mexico City.

In the study, the team used a tool called i-Tree Canopy to estimate the current tree coverage in cities and the potential for more urban forest cover, and worked out the benefits that would bring. They estimated the current tree cover in ten megacities in five continents, looked at the benefits of urban forests – including removing pollution from the air, saving energy, and providing food – and approximated the current value of those benefits at over $500 million per year.

Theodore Endreny, Ph.D., PH, PE, lead author of the paper and now professor of the Department of Environmental Resources Engineering at the State University of New York ESF campus, said, “By cultivating the trees within the city, residents and visitors get direct benefits. They’re getting an immediate cleansing of the air that’s around them. They’re getting that direct cooling from the tree, and even food and other products. There’s potential to increase the coverage of urban forests in our megacities, and that would make them more sustainable, better places to live.”

Source: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180118162455.htm

Introducing Stephen Lovering, Technical Product Consultant, Victoria, Vancouver Island BC, Canada

Steve Lovering Photo - Citygreen

Kicking off 2018, we’re thrilled to welcome Stephen Lovering to the Citygreen team, based in Canada. With a Bachelor’s Degree in Landscape Architecture from Leeds Metropolitan University in the UK, Stephen has spent the last five years assisting municipalities, design professionals, and contractors with innovative solutions and products relating to the building industry. Previous to that, he worked as a Landscape Architect designing new communities in and around Calgary, Alberta.

The common thread connecting all his previous roles is an in-depth understanding of how landscapes effect the way people live and move within their community, and the impact this has on their happiness and health. Well-designed green spaces and well-located tree canopies enable people to move around streets, parks, and playgrounds easily – providing a raft of physical, mental, and economic benefits in the process.

As Technical Product Consultant at Citygreen, Stephen will collaborate closely with councils, municipalities, and design professionals in Canada to incorporate cutting-edge urban landscape solutions into their projects, while supporting contractors with best practice techniques and technical knowledge around the installation of Citygreen products. Together, they’ll be addressing issues around public health, lack of tree canopy coverage, and stormwater development – contributing to our overriding vision of a world where sustainable green space is within reach of every person, every day, and natural resources are utilized (not wasted) for the benefit of mankind.

To get in touch with Stephen, call 778-533-7764, email stephen.lovering@citygreen.com, connect with him on LinkedIn, or book a meeting time below.book a meeting

 

 

Load More...